Central City Brewing steps up again with IPA for Autism program

Central City Brewing steps up again with IPA for Autism program

Central City Brewing announces fCentral City IPA for Autismunds from specially marked Red Racer IPA go towards Autism research

Surrey, B.C. – Central City Brewers + Distillers is launching its annual IPA for Autism program to help raise funds for autism research initiatives at Simon Fraser University (SFU). April is Autism Awareness Month and April 2nd is World Autism Day.

Central City will donate $2 from every 6-pack of 355ml cans and $0.25 from every 473ml cans of specially marked IPA for Autism Red Racer IPAs to autism research. In addition, $0.25 from every pint of IPA sold at participating BC restaurants and pubs will also be donated. Red Racer IPA is Central City’s best selling craft beer and is available in most Canadian provinces.

Since 2012, Central City has raised a total of $270,000 for autism research, and has contributed to the Canucks for Autism and UBC research into the genetic link with Autism. They will donate another $100,000 this year to the Autism research initiatives at SFU, and has goals to double their fundraising efforts for this worthy cause. The program is generously supported by its partners, most notably Ball Corporation, Canada Malting/Country Malt, Barnstorm Creative, Westkey Graphics and VN Graphics.

Autism now affects 1 in 68 children: 1 in 42 boys and 1 in 189 girls, a 30 per cent increase over the last survey released in 2012 when it was 1 in 88 children. While currently there is no cure for autism, research has shown that early intervention treatments can improve a child’s development. Early and encouraging results suggest that one treatment in particular, hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), can improve communication and behavior in children with autism. Further research, however, is needed to conclusively establish if HBOT is an effective treatment for autism.

Darryll Frost, President and Founder of Central City, is the father of six-year-old Callum, who was diagnosed with Pervasive Development Disorder, a type of autism, when he was only three years old. Darryll and his wife Lee invested in a variety of treatments for Callum and found that by combining the GAPS diet with HBOT, Callum’s development has drastically improved.

“Callum has been using a number of treatments and the HBOT has done wonders for him,” says Darryll Frost, President and Founder of Central City Brewers + Distillers. “Before we started his treatments, he was completely non-verbal and often had extreme behavioral issues. But with treatment, he is like a different person and can now communicate, play, laugh and enjoy life like any typical child.”

Since 2012, Central City has partnered with SFU on a Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) and Magnetoencephalography (MEG) study at SFU, the first of its kind in Canada that specifically studies the effectiveness of using hyperbaric oxygen therapy on children with autism. Included in the research is the use of MEG neuroimaging to evaluate whether HBOT can positively impact brain activity underlying cognition and behavior in children with autism.

SFU researchers include Dr. Ryan D’Arcy, one of the world’s foremost neuroscientists, and Sherri Ferguson, Director of SFU’s Environmental Medicine and Physiology Unit (EMPU), home to Canada’s only civilian research hyper/hypobaric chamber. Dr. Sam Doesburg is a neuroscientist and an expert in MEG brain imaging who will be investigating the potential for new treatments that could improve the lives of those with autism, including treatments involving SFU’s hyperbaric oxygen chamber.


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